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We will be serving refreshments along with a friendly chat about how race has affected our lives. This Sunday and the following Sunday as well!! Please join us to help the community share experiences and grow together! ...

We will be serving refreshments along with a friendly chat about how race has affected our lives. This Sunday and the following Sunday as well!! Please join us to help the community share experiences and grow together!

Discussion Group: How Has Racism Affected Your Life?

March 26, 2017, 3:00pm - March 26, 2017, 5:00pm

Rose M. Nolen Black History Library

We will be serving refreshments along with a friendly chat about how race has affected our lives. This Sunday and the following Sunday as well!! Please join us to help the community share experiences and grow together!

3 months ago

Rose M. Nolen Black History Library shared their Discussion Group: How Has Race Affected Your Life?. ...

We will be serving refreshments along with a friendly chat about how race has affected our lives. Please join us to help the community share experiences and grow together!

Discussion Group: How Has Race Affected Your Life?

March 19, 2017, 3:00pm - March 19, 2017, 5:00pm

Rose M. Nolen Black History Library

We will be serving refreshments along with a friendly chat about how race has affected our lives. Please join us to help the community share experiences and grow together!

3 months ago

Rose M. Nolen Black History Library, Chéri Sides and 1 other like this

Rose M. Nolen Black History LibraryCome join us this sunday at 3 p.m. for punch and cookies!!3 months ago

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We will be serving refreshments along with a friendly chat about how race has affected our lives. Please join us to help the community share experiences and grow together! ...

We will be serving refreshments along with a friendly chat about how race has affected our lives. Please join us to help the community share experiences and grow together!

Discussion Group: How Has Race Affected Your Life?

March 19, 2017, 3:00pm - March 19, 2017, 5:00pm

Rose M. Nolen Black History Library

We will be serving refreshments along with a friendly chat about how race has affected our lives. Please join us to help the community share experiences and grow together!

3 months ago

Rose M. Nolen Black History Library shared The HistoryMakers's post. ...

On this day in 1897, African American inventor Andrew J. Beard was awarded a patent for his automatic railroad car coupling device, the Jenny Coupler, which is still in use today. In the early days of the railroad, cars were manually linked together, an extremely dangerous process that required a rail worker to brace himself between the cars and drop a metal pin in place at the precise moment the cars came together. Many workers lost life and limb; Beard himself labored in rail yards and saw horrific accidents take place and even lost his own leg. Beard’s Jenny Coupler, which hooks cars together automatically, has saved untold numbers of lives. Beard's other inventions include two plow designs and a rotary steam engine. Working on the railroad was a formative experience for many African American families. Consider beloved actor and HistoryMaker Ossie Davis, who recalled his father’s work on the railroad and his place in the community of Waycross, Georgia: “My daddy, though he was a worker, was no ordinary worker. In the first place, he was a railroad man, and in Waycross and Cogdell during those days, people who worked on the railroad were looked upon with a little more reverence than the average worker. Daddy was not a Pullman porter or anything of that kind. He worked on the section gang that built the railroads and cut the right of way, and kept the equipment maintained and the brush cleaned, and all of that sort of thing. He was in charge of the section gang, and this was something of an anomaly in Waycross, Georgia, because there were people in and out of the Ku Klux Klan who thought that my daddy, being a black man, did not deserve having the job of being in charge of keeping up this little railroad… As I watched him as a child, I became aware of the degree to which he was not only very much like the men but in his own way quite different. He was a leader. He was a person whom the men instinctively called Chief, and both whites and blacks in this segregated community looked up to him.”

7 months ago

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